Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 consultation

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Consultation on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 is now closed.

Thank you to the Western Australian veterinarians, veterinary nurses, other animal health providers, and the community who provided feedback on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 during the consultation period.

Consultation process

Consultation on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 opened on 13 May and closed on 24 June 2020.

Before making a submission, stakeholders were asked to read the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020:

Stakeholders were able to gain further information at consultation webinars, via the Q&A section on this page and by emailing vetpracticebill@dpird.wa.gov.au.

Stakeholders could make submissions via the online submission form or via direct email.

Consultation summary report

DPIRD received 102 submissions during the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 consultation, comprising 55 written submissions and 47 submissions linked to an online petition. A range of stakeholders made submissions, including veterinarians, veterinary nurses, peak industry bodies, government agencies, and users of veterinary services.

The submissions have been analysed and have helped inform the process to proceed to a final draft of the Bill ready for introduction into Parliament.

The summary report and publically available submissions to the consultation can be viewed here:

What happens next

The Bill is being reviewed and will be introduced into Parliament when the review process is completed.

The new Regulations are currently being drafted. Stakeholders will be consulted on the new Regulations at a later date.

Updates will be published on this page.

Consultation on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 is now closed.

Thank you to the Western Australian veterinarians, veterinary nurses, other animal health providers, and the community who provided feedback on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 during the consultation period.

Consultation process

Consultation on the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 opened on 13 May and closed on 24 June 2020.

Before making a submission, stakeholders were asked to read the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020:

Stakeholders were able to gain further information at consultation webinars, via the Q&A section on this page and by emailing vetpracticebill@dpird.wa.gov.au.

Stakeholders could make submissions via the online submission form or via direct email.

Consultation summary report

DPIRD received 102 submissions during the Veterinary Practice Bill 2020 consultation, comprising 55 written submissions and 47 submissions linked to an online petition. A range of stakeholders made submissions, including veterinarians, veterinary nurses, peak industry bodies, government agencies, and users of veterinary services.

The submissions have been analysed and have helped inform the process to proceed to a final draft of the Bill ready for introduction into Parliament.

The summary report and publically available submissions to the consultation can be viewed here:

What happens next

The Bill is being reviewed and will be introduced into Parliament when the review process is completed.

The new Regulations are currently being drafted. Stakeholders will be consulted on the new Regulations at a later date.

Updates will be published on this page.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Ask your questions about the Veterinary Practice Bill here. We can answer your question on the site or you can request us to answer you privately.

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    The definition of veterinary medicine states; veterinary medicine — 2 (a) includes, but is not limited to, the following — 3 (i) diagnosing diseases or physiological conditions 4 in, and injuries to, animals; 5 (ii) medical treatment of animals; 6 (iii) performing surgical procedures on animals; 7 (iv) administering anaesthetics to animals; 8 (v) an act of a kind prescribed as being an act of 9 veterinary medicine; 10 but 11 (b) does not include an act of a kind prescribed as not being 12 an act of veterinary medicine; If i administer medication prescribed by a registered vet to our animals, will this be classified as medical treatment under the proposed act?

    Bruce Zencich asked 6 months ago

    Hi Bruce, thank you for your question. Please note, while the Regulations are not yet prepared, the Regulations are likely to allow people to perform acts similar to those under regulation 45 of the Veterinary Surgeons Regulations 1979, such as medicating an animal with a registered vaccine or medicament (r45(f)). We believe this will address the scenario you raise regarding administering treatments under the direction of a veterinarian.

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    Within the definitions of the proposed act; veterinary medicine , states; veterinary medicine — 2 (a) includes, but is not limited to, the following — 3 (i) diagnosing diseases or physiological conditions 4 in, and injuries to, animals; 5 (ii) medical treatment of animals; 6 (iii) performing surgical procedures on animals; 7 (iv) administering anaesthetics to animals; 8 (v) an act of a kind prescribed as being an act of 9 veterinary medicine; 10 but 11 (b) does not include an act of a kind prescribed as not being 12 an act of veterinary medicine; does medical treatment include: bandaging the legs of a injured horse? administering a worm table to our cat?

    Bruce Zencich asked 6 months ago

    Hi Bruce, thank you for your second question. Please note, while the Regulations are not yet prepared, they are likely to allow people to perform acts similar to those under regulation 45 of the Veterinary Surgeons Regulations 1979, such as dressing and suturing wounds (r45(a)), and medicating an animal with a registered vaccine or medicament (r45(f)). We believe this will address the scenarios you have proposed in your question regarding bandaging an injured animal’s legs and administering worming tablets to animals.

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    Section 56 states; 56. Carrying out acts of veterinary medicine 4 (1) A person must not carry out an act of veterinary medicine unless 5 the person is — 6 (a) a veterinarian; or 7 (b) a veterinary nurse; or 8 (c) an authorised person The definition of veterinary medicine; veterinary medicine — 2 (a) includes, but is not limited to, the following — 3 (i) diagnosing diseases or physiological conditions 4 in, and injuries to, animals; 5 (ii) medical treatment of animals; 6 (iii) performing surgical procedures on animals; 7 (iv) administering anaesthetics to animals; 8 (v) an act of a kind prescribed as being an act of 9 veterinary medicine; 10 but 11 (b) does not include an act of a kind prescribed as not being 12 an act of veterinary medicine; However i can not find a definition of "an act of a kind prescribed as being an act of veterinary medicine " within the proposed act. Can you please advise the proposed or actual definition?

    Bruce Zencich asked 6 months ago

    Hi Bruce, the Regulations will prescribe acts that may be carried out by people other than a veterinarian, veterinary nurse, or authorised person. The regulations are currently being drafted and will be the subject of consultation at a later date. It is not settled what acts will be prescribed as not being acts of veterinary medicine. However, the regulations are likely to include acts similar to those under regulation 45 of the Veterinary Surgeons Regulations 1979.

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    Dear DPIRD, Where in this new Act does it allow me to treat my own animals? The previous act allowed acts of veterinary surgery to be performed if there was no reward. I can not find a similar provision in this act. Is this Act saying that I need to call a veterinarian every time my horse needs an injection or a bandage changed? This seems to be a huge oversight and there needs to be a section added which allows acts to be done where there is no reward. The Legal profession act allows a person to provide legal advice if they are not registered as long as they do not get any reward for it. Why should there be a higher standard for Vets when every pet owner would be committing an offence on a daily basis?

    Venus asked 7 months ago

    Thanks Venus for your question. Unlike the current Act, the Bill does not include provisions related to acts of veterinary medicine that may be performed by anyone or by authorised people. The regulations being prepared will list those acts that may be carried out by persons other than veterinarians.